[alisonhope]

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Kale and Sausage Penne with Lemon Cream Sauce | SAVEUR →

Crack pasta.

— 6 days ago

deppgallery-br:

“Some days you want him to live, some days you don’t.”

(Source: drake-ramoray, via nearlyhuman)

— 1 week ago with 8018 notes
"A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave."
Mahatma Gandhi (via modernhepburn)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject, via modernhepburn)

— 1 week ago with 1435 notes
anyamekye:

Clouds in a lighting storm (by nickbilton)

anyamekye:

Clouds in a lighting storm (by nickbilton)

(via modernhepburn)

— 1 week ago with 272 notes

fotojournalismus:

New York City during the 1980s was an entirely different kind of city than it is today. Street photographer Richard Sandler spent much of the decade capturing the urban grit found along the busy sidewalks, bustling street corners, and crowded subway trains throughout the city.

(via mymodernmet)

— 2 weeks ago with 2557 notes
lostateminor:

>
Photo series shows the reactions of New York subway riders when strangers fall asleep on them

I’m from London, a city famous for holding millions of people that go to incredible lengths not to talk to each other. The morning commute on the London Underground is silent as the grave, people jammed in cheek by jowl, yet still trying in vain to imagine there isn’t somebody else face less then six inches from the end of their nose. It’s depressing, unfriendly, a little shameful and more or less true for every metro/subway/whateveryoucallit in the world.
American artist George Ferrandi is attacking this concept of passive hostility on city trains with her photo series It Felt Like I Knew You… Ferrandi’s statement for the project is as follows:
‘I ride the NYC subway trains, usually in the evening when the seats are full. I focus on the shape of the space between the person sitting next to me and myself. I attempt to mentally and emotionally re-sculpt that space. In my mind, I reshape it- from the stiff and guarded space between strangers to the soft and yielding space between friends. I direct all my energy to this space between us. When the space palpably changes, and I completely feel like the stranger sitting next to me is my friend, I rest my head on that person’s shoulder’.
Part peformance, part photography, It Felt Like I Knew You… is a heartwarming project. It’s such a joy to see people reacting in a positive way, even if it is well-mannered sniggering. The best outcomes are when the other person tacitly excepts the artist’s head on their shoulder and they ride in peace. The question is, how would you react?

lostateminor:

>

Photo series shows the reactions of New York subway riders when strangers fall asleep on them

image

I’m from London, a city famous for holding millions of people that go to incredible lengths not to talk to each other. The morning commute on the London Underground is silent as the grave, people jammed in cheek by jowl, yet still trying in vain to imagine there isn’t somebody else face less then six inches from the end of their nose. It’s depressing, unfriendly, a little shameful and more or less true for every metro/subway/whateveryoucallit in the world.

American artist George Ferrandi is attacking this concept of passive hostility on city trains with her photo series It Felt Like I Knew You… Ferrandi’s statement for the project is as follows:

‘I ride the NYC subway trains, usually in the evening when the seats are full. I focus on the shape of the space between the person sitting next to me and myself. I attempt to mentally and emotionally re-sculpt that space. In my mind, I reshape it- from the stiff and guarded space between strangers to the soft and yielding space between friends. I direct all my energy to this space between us. When the space palpably changes, and I completely feel like the stranger sitting next to me is my friend, I rest my head on that person’s shoulder’.

Part peformance, part photography, It Felt Like I Knew You… is a heartwarming project. It’s such a joy to see people reacting in a positive way, even if it is well-mannered sniggering. The best outcomes are when the other person tacitly excepts the artist’s head on their shoulder and they ride in peace. The question is, how would you react?

— 3 weeks ago with 7 notes
"Between what is said and not meant, and what is meant and not said, most of love is lost."
Khalil Gibran  (via modernhepburn)

(Source: psych-facts, via modernhepburn)

— 3 weeks ago with 13241 notes
"Be grateful for the wound that pushes you towards God."
Yasmin Mogahed (via modernhepburn)

(Source: undercoverfortress, via modernhepburn)

— 3 weeks ago with 12457 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

From 29 Satellie Photos That Will Change Your Perspective On Planet Earth

1. 53.0066°N 7.1920°E. Bourtange is a village with a population of 430 in the municipality of Vlagtwedde in the Netherlands. The star fort was built in 1593 during the Eighty Years’ War when William I of Orange wanted to control the only road between Germany and the city of Groningen. Bourtange was restored to its mid-18th-century state in 1960 and is currently used as an open-air museum.

2. 40°46’56”N; 73°57’55”W. Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That’s 6% of the island of Manhattan.

3. 41°23′27″N 2°09′47″E. Barcelona, Spain.

4. 5°26′15″N 12°20′9″E. Venice, Italy

5. 31.079844, -97.80145. In 2013, there were 923,400 home construction projects in the United States. Killeen, Texas.

6. 36.211001, -115.266914. The Desert Shores Community in Las Vegas, Nevada contains 3,351 units and four man-made lakes. Las Vegas, Nevada

7. 25°50′17″N 50°36′18″E. Durrat Al Bahrain will consist of 15 connected, artificial islands (including six atolls, five fish-shaped, and two crescent-shaped). Construction costs are estimated at $6 billion and the project is slated for completion in mid-2015. Bahrain.

8. 5°40′S 52°44′W. Clearcutting operations in the Amazon Rainforest of Para, Brazil branch out from one of the state’s central roads. Pará, Brazil.

9. 32.170890°N 110.855184°W. Tucson, Arizona.

10. 36.78234°N 2.74315°W. Plasticulture refers to the practice of using plastic materials in agricultural applications. This is visible in the plains and valleys of Almeria, Spain where nearly 20,000 hectares are covered by these greenhouse structures. Almeria, Spain

(via travelthisworld)

— 3 weeks ago with 24004 notes